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South Africa     CITIES AND TOWNS Show services:
South Africa has 862 listed cities and towns. These towns range from a handful of residents to Johannesburg's greater metropolitan area with 10 million people.

Cities and towns in the Western Cape are steeped in history, dating back to the 17th century.

The largest city in the country, Johannesburg, was formed in 1886, following the gold rush.

Kimberley had the first street lamps in the word and was formed in the wake of a huge diamond discovery.

862 CITIES AND TOWNS IN SOUTH AFRICA      Province:      Search:

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These are a few of the more popular towns in South Africa

    Augrabies, Northern Cape in the region of Siyanda - formerly Green Kalahari

    Beaufort West, Western Cape in the region of Central Karoo

    Bloemfontein, Free State in the region of Transgariep

    Cape Town, Western Cape in the region of Cape Town
Cape Town (Afrikaans: Kaapstad; Xhosa: iKapa) is the second-most populous city in South Africa,[3] and the provincial capital and primate city of the Western Cape. As the seat of the National Parliament, it is also the legislative capital of the country. It forms part of the City of Cape Town metropolitan municipality. The city is famous for its harbour as well as its natural setting in the Cape floral kingdom, including such well-known landmarks as Table Mountain and Cape Point. Cape Town is also Africa's most popular tourist destination.[6]

Located on the shore of Table Bay, Cape Town was originally developed by the Dutch East India Company as a victualling (supply) station for Dutch ships sailing to Eastern Africa, India, and the Far East. Jan van Riebeeck's arrival on 6 April 1652 established the first permanent European settlement in South Africa. Cape Town quickly outgrew its original purpose as the first European outpost at the Castle of Good Hope, becoming the economic and cultural hub of the Cape Colony. Until the Witwatersrand Gold Rush and the development of Johannesburg, Cape Town was the largest city in South Africa.

Today it is one of the most multicultural cities in the world, reflecting its role as a major destination for immigrants and expatriates to South Africa. As of 2007[update] the city had an estimated population of 3.5 million.[3] Cape Town's land area of 2,455 square kilometres (948 sq mi) is larger than other South African cities, resulting in a comparatively lower population density of 1,425 inhabitants per square kilometre (3,690 /sq mi).[2]

The city was named the World Design Capital for 2014 by the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design.

    Colenso, KwaZulu Natal in the region of uThukela

    Colesberg, Northern Cape in the region of Pixley ka Seme - formerly Upper Karoo

    De Aar, Northern Cape in the region of Pixley ka Seme - formerly Upper Karoo

    Durban, KwaZulu Natal in the region of eThekwini

    East London, Eastern Cape in the region of Amatola

    Fish Hoek, Western Cape in the region of Cape Town

    Franschhoek, Western Cape in the region of Cape Winelands

    Hermanus, Western Cape in the region of Overberg

    Johannesburg, Gauteng in the region of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality
Johannesburg also known as Jozi, Jo'burg or Egoli, is the largest city in South Africa, by population. Johannesburg is the provincial capital of Gauteng, the wealthiest province in South Africa, having the largest economy of any metropolitan region in Sub-Saharan Africa. The city is one of the 40 largest metropolitan areas in the world,[6] and is also the world's largest city not situated on a river, lake, or coastline. It claims to be the lightning capital of the world, though this title is also claimed by others. While Johannesburg is not one of South Africa's three capital cities, it is the seat of the Constitutional Court, which has the final word on interpretation of South Africa's new post-Apartheid constitution. The city is the source of a large-scale gold and diamond trade, due to its location on the mineral-rich Witwatersrand range of hills. Johannesburg is served by O.R. Tambo International Airport, the largest and busiest airport in Africa and a gateway for international air travel to and from the rest of Southern Africa. More recently Lanseria International Airport has started international flights, and is situated conveniently on the opposite side of the metropolis.

According to the 2007 Community Survey, the population of the municipal city was 3,888,180 and the population of the Greater Johannesburg Metropolitan Area was 7,151,447. A broader definition of the Johannesburg metropolitan area, including Ekurhuleni, the West Rand, Soweto and Lenasia, has a population of 10,267,700. The municipal city's land area of 1,645 km2 (635 sq mi) is very large when compared to other cities, resulting in a moderate population density of 2,364 /km2 (6,120 /sq mi).

Johannesburg includes Soweto, which was a separate city from the late 1970s until the 1990s. Originally an acronym for "South-Western Townships", Soweto originated as a collection of settlements on the outskirts of Johannesburg populated mostly by native African workers in the gold mining industry. Eventually incorporated into Johannesburg, the apartheid regime (in power 1948-1994) separated Soweto from the rest of Johannesburg to make it a completely Black area.

The area called Lenasia is now also part of Johannesburg, and is predominantly populated by those of Indian ethnicity since the apartheid era.

The Gauteng province as a whole is growing rapidly due to mass urbanisation, which is a feature of many developing countries. According to the State of the Cities Report, the urban portion of Gauteng - comprising primarily the cities of Johannesburg, Ekurhuleni (the East Rand) and Tshwane (greater Pretoria) - will be a polycentric urban region with a projected population of some 14.6 million people by 2015.

    Kimberley, Northern Cape in the region of Frances Baard - formerly Diamond Fields

    King William's Town, Eastern Cape in the region of Amatola

    Knysna, Western Cape in the region of Eden

    Laingsburg, Western Cape in the region of Central Karoo

    Matjiesfontein, Western Cape in the region of Central Karoo

    Paarl, Western Cape in the region of Cape Winelands

    Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu Natal in the region of uMgungundlovu

    Piketberg, Western Cape in the region of West Coast

    Pilgrim's Rest, Mpumalanga in the region of Escarpment

    Plettenberg Bay, Western Cape in the region of Eden

    Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape

    Potchefstroom, Northwest

    Pretoria, Gauteng in the region of Tshwane

    Richards Bay, KwaZulu Natal in the region of Uthungulu

    Rustenburg, Northwest

    Stellenbosch, Western Cape in the region of Cape Winelands

    Tulbagh, Western Cape in the region of Cape Winelands

    Upington, Northern Cape in the region of Siyanda - formerly Green Kalahari

    Van Reenen, Free State in the region of Eastern Free State

 






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